Posts Tagged ‘cars’

Doing a lot of live sound work, ear protection is a major issue, whether its a gig I’m mixing or a gig I’m watching I need to keep my ears protected, and I’ve found that the ear plugs from this site: http://www.earpeace.com/ are very good for the price. The frequency drop is decent across the spectrum, they’re cheap, skin coloured (so people will be less likely to see them and call you a pussy if you’re at a metal concert or something.) They’re easy to put in and pull out and come with a metal cylinder that you can attach to a key change to keep them in, I normally don’t keep them in the entire gig if I’m doing sound, mainly just because I end up turning everything up too loud, but I can still comfortably mix with them in. I highly recommend to anyone in loud sound environments often and don’t have very big budgets get a pair of these.

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My dad bought this old Holden ute for us to bush bash around in at our farm. But me and my quest for experience couldn’t see this as anything less than a perfect opportunity to get some car audio experience, before this all I’d done is put a new head unit in my own car which was a simple remove dash, pull out old unit, cut off wires and attach wires for new unit job.

The ute however, started like this:

It didn’t matter how hard I tried, I just couldn’t get the Bluetooth working! And the fact that the speakers had been removed from the doors didn’t help either.

So I decided everything needed to be replaced. I went down to Jaycar and picked up a cheap head unit with radio and MP3 input and a pair of 6″ drivers to work with.

First part of the job was to remove the old unit. This required tedious screw removal from the glove box and under side of the dash to get it off, and eventually I figured out to get the unit itself out I had to unscrew the knobs on either side. After that I decided to just cut all the wires as it would be safer and easier to redo it.

To make things more difficult this units hole was smaller than the new unit. So after some awkward angle grinding, eventually I got the size to what was needed, and inserted the head unit frame.

Next was the speakers, this was a pretty simple put them in the hole and screw them in process, then I ran the wires through the doors, behind the floor mat and around to where the unit was.

Then comes the fun part, wiring. First I wired up the positives and negatives for the 2 speakers to get them out of the way, then I could concentrate on the power. My original plan was to wire both the ACC and the Battery wires straight to the car battery, but a friend of my dads showed me I could wire it straight into the fuse box. We tested what fuses were there to find one that would give constant power without a key in the ignition and one that would only give power when the key was on accessory, which meant I could set it up like a normal car head unit! So we pulled out the 2 fuses and stuffed the end of the Battery wire under the fuse without the constant stream and the accessory wire under the one with the constant stream.

*Blue – Battery Wire

*Red – Accessory Wire

Then all that was left to do was tape up the wires to the wires coming out of the attachment for the back of the uni…

Plug the attachment into the unit, plug in the antenna cable, slide the unit into the frame and put the underside of the dash back on!

And that was my super old car audio makeover!

http://soundcloud.com/audiophilesjourney/rave-party-version-1

Synthesisers used are the ES2, ESX24 Sampler, Ultrabeat Drum Sampler and Toxic Biohazard.

Track 1: Bass. 3 oscillators (saw, saw down an octave and saw up an octave) and a long attack time to create a very rave bass sound.

Track 2: Similar settings to track one, but attack time was changed to create a time clash, creating a nice crunchy sound.

Track 3: Kick drum. Kick sample with some settings tweaked for a fat thud and heavy sound.

Track 4: Snare. Snare sample with some tweaking for techno-like snare sound.

Track 5: Hi-hat. Sample with tweaking.

Track 6: Lead synth. Mono synth of all saw waves, one an octave lower, some slight distortion. Resonance set to about midway.

Track 7: Same as track 6 but with more processing and some automation.

Track 8: Sampled choir using ESX24 synth with some tweaking.

Track 9: Intro bass. Sine wave and synced saw wave. Lots of drive, high resonance and chorus.

Track 10: Phat synth made using a custom wave, an offset square wave and a slightly less offset square wave.

Track 11: Phat synth 2. 3 saws and a noise wave. Quite a bit of detune.
Effects:

All tracks were given EQ and compression to help them sit in the mix.

Hi-hat was panned slightly to one side.

Lead synth was given some delay.

Automated copy of lead synth was given an automatic filter.

Choir was given delay and stereo spread.

Intro bass was given a limiter, delay and an auto filter.

Phat synth one and two were given stereo spread and a limiter.

An auxiliary channel strip was set up and given a compressor with a bus 2 side chain and the kick drum was bussed to it with bus 2, the output of bus 2 was set to bus 3. Then the side chains on the 2 phat synths were set to bus 3. Creating heavy pumping.

Auxiliary channel strip 1 was set up with a reverb and all channels were bussed to it, more or less depending on how much they needed.

The beginning of the piece is supposed to give a spacey sort of effect (spacey the way it is created in pop music, more so than the way it is created in sonic art pieces or sound effects) then fill up the audio spectrum with big rave chords to prepare for an 808 drop into hard rave. The only outside source I have used is the ‘Drop the bass’ sample which is from a song called ‘Drop the Base’ by DJ Raaban and has been cut and arranged into multiple samples. Everything else has been created based on my own current knowledge and through experimentation.

If anybody has any tips for things that they don’t think are working or how I can improve the mix, I would love to hear them!